#AskGlaston Episode 25: How to avoid glass breakage inside the chiller with full low-E glass loads?

This week, we’re dealing with the following question:
I have a problem with Low-E glass; when entering full loads, the glass is broken inside the chiller but when entering half loads glass goes good. Also, if entering full loads with high heating time, the glass doesn’t brake, however, the distortion is very high. What can I do the fix the problem?

For this week’s questions, see our full video response below!
As always, remember to learn, share and succeed!

I have a problem with Low-E glass; when entering full loads, the glass is broken inside the chiller but when entering half loads glass goes good. Also, if entering full loads with high heating time, the glass doesn’t brake, however, the distortion is very high. What can I do the fix the problem?

We’re dealing with a traditional tempering challenge here. When you’re running a smaller amount of glass, it needs less energy and heat in order to reach the set point, so it’s unlikely to break. Glass is usually broken if it is too cold. In your particular case, you were running Low-E glass where the top surface reflects the heat. In such situations, you should use convection on the top to ensure the glass is heated enough and increase the bottom temperature to make sure the full load will have enough heat and not break. Also, with larger loads, we advice to increase the corner set points plus make sure that the corner heaters are working properly and that the set points for both corner and bottom heaters are higher than normal when running full loads.

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Miika Äppelqvist

Encourages transparent solutions in buildings and ways of working. Seven years of experience from being a glass-man in product management, sales and projects with a focus on glass heat treatment. Believes helping is the best marketing any company can do. Father of two toddlers and a wannabe sportsman with an internal love of ice hockey.